UNIT STATUS: Welcome to the Fort Hood, Texas | 1st Cavalry Division web presence. Incoming Soldiers, please click on the newcomers link. For information to help understand the EFMP Process click on the EFMP Link For post information please call: 254-287-1110. If you notice any Suspicious Activity report it to:   254-288-COPS.

Welcome to the Fort Hood, Texas | 1st Cavalry Division web presence. Incoming Soldiers, please click on the newcomers link. For information to help understand the EFMP Process click on the EFMP Link For post information please call: 254-287-1110. If you notice any Suspicious Activity report it to:   254-288-COPS.

    Important Information

    Equal Opportunity
    Phone Number: 254-287-2978

    Suicide Prevention 
    National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255),
    Press 1 for the
    Military Crisis Line

    Army SHARP

    Fort Hood Sharp
    24/7 Hotline 254-28SHARP or 254-319-4671
    DOD Safe Helpline 877-995-5247

    Domestic Violence Victim
    Services Crisis Line

    254-702-4953
    (operated 24/7/365)

    Family Advocacy Program
    Hotline 254-287-CARE (2273)
    for spouse/child abuse reporting
    (operated 24/7/365)

3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team
1st Cavalry Division

COL John K. Woodward
CSM Alfred R. Ronneburg

"Greywolf"

3rd Brigade Combat Team

Staff Duty: (254) 287-1920
PAO: (254) 288-7059

215th BSTB
LTC Michael F. Hammond
CSM Ruth Drewitt

 

3-8 Cav
LTC Brian McCarthy
CSM Brad Owens

2-7 Cav
LTC William D. Wade
CSM John M. Lucas

 

6-9 Cav (ARS)
LTC Niel Smith
CSM Edward Bryant

1-12 Cav (CAB)
LTC Andrew Kiser
CSM Shelly Jenkins


3d BEB
LTC Thomas Brock
CSM Paul J. Vedros


2-82 FA
LTC William L. Davis
CSM David Nal

3ABCT History

The 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division was first constituted on 29 August 1917. It was organized in December 1917 as Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, an element of the 15th Cavalry Division, at Ft Sam Houston. The Regimental units assigned to the Brigade were the 12th and 13th Cavalry. The Brigade joined its sister units along the Texas-Mexican border while awaiting deployment to Europe as a converted Field Artillery Unit. However the end of World War I caused the Brigade to demobilize in the fall of 1919, and although the regiments underneath were transferred to the newly created 1st Cavalry Division, the Brigade headquarters remained on the inactive list until the advent of World War 2.

3rd Brigade was reactivated as the Division Trans for 9th Armored Division and in this capacity served in the European Theater of Operations. The unit particularly distinguished itself during the 9th Division’s holding actions against German forces in the opening days of the Battle of the Bugle. The unit was awarded two Meritorious Unit Commendations with streamers embroidered Europe 1944 and Europe 1945. Following World War II, the unit returned to the United States and was inactivated. It remained inactive until 15 July 1963, when it was relieved from assignment to the 9th Armored Division, converted and re-designated as HHC, 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division in Korea.

The Brigade’s time along the DMZ in Korea was short as within a year of it being activated the decision was made to make the 1st Cavalry Division the test bed for airmobile warfare in the United States Army. With this decision, the Brigade cased its colors in Korea and uncased its colors at FT Benning, Georgia, replacing the 2nd Infantry Division. The Regiments at this time assigned to the Brigade were the 1st and 2nd Battalion of the 7th Cavalry Regiment. The Brigade deployed to Vietnam in September of 1965 and within weeks of arrival in Vietnam was heavily involved in the battles of the Ia Drang Valley. For its exceptional performance in the campaign, the Brigade received the Presidential Unit Citation. The Brigade continued to distinguish itself in the following years, notably in the clearing of the An Lap Basin, the defense of Hue City and the relief of Khe Sanh. While the remainder of the Division returned to the states in 1971, 3rd Brigade was detached and became the battle space owner for the Division, being one of the last Brigade sized Army units to leave South Vietnam.

Upon the Brigade’s return from Vietnam it was constituted as a mechanized infantry brigade and given the nickname GREYWOLF in commemoration of the Apache nickname for General George Crook one of the Army’s greatest western fighters, Nantan Lupan. The Brigade was deactivated in 1980 and only reentered active service with the reflagging of the Tiger Brigade of 2nd Armor Division at the close of the Gulf War. The Brigade deployed as the first no notice response force to Kuwait in 1996 in support of Operation Desert Strike to deter Iraqi forces from threatening the Emirate.

In the aftermath of 9/11, the GREYWOLF Brigade deployed to Baghdad, Iraq with the 1st Cavalry Division in support of OEF II and was tasked with protecting the Green Zone as well as securing the volatile Haifa Street. The Brigade deployed back to Iraq in the 2007 surge and was credited with defeating Al-Qaeda in Diyala Province and its capital city of Baqubah. The Brigade’s third deployment to Iraq saw it overseeing the transfer of authority from US to Iraqi Army in Mosul province in 2008-2009. GREYWOLF deployed in support of Operation New Dawn in February 2011 and conducted stability operations throughout Southern Iraq. They were among the last Brigades to leave Iraq that December.

Since the end of the Second Gulf War, GREYWOLF Brigade has refocused itself as an expeditionary brigade which has already deployed the first independent Combined Arms Battalion to Korea in over thirty years as well as a Cavalry Squadron to the Sinai. It also conducted the Army’s first Decisive Action/High Intensity National Training Center rotation after 10 years of counterinsurgency focus exercises. GREYWOLF Brigade stands ready to deploy anywhere in the world in defense of our nation.

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